Page 2 of 17

In Conversation with Lucia Cuba

Coinciding with the Mundo Latinx (Latinx World) exhibition at Fashion Space Gallery, join us on the 30 April for a conversation with fashion designer, artist and social researcher, Lucia Cuba to explore her practice and use of garments as performative and political devices.

Latin America, 4 girls with long dark hair in plaits stand or crouch by a pavement. The hair completely covers their faces.

Lucia Cuba, La Espera/ The Waiting, from the series ‘Articulo 6’, 2013, Courtesy of the artist. Photography: Erasmo Wong Production & Art Direction: Lucia Cuba Performers: Jessica Rojas, Flor Vergara, Nataly Zúniga, Pilar Trujillo

The discussion will also examine counter-narratives within fashion and textiles and Lucia’s continuous questioning of the established language of fashion through projects such as Articulo 6, Exercises on Health (EOH) and other exercises.

 Mundo Latinx is at Fashion Space Gallery until 4 May 2019.
Visit the LCF events page for more CfFC events

Motive / Motif: Artists commemorate the Suffragettes

“.. the whole difference is the difference of motive …. & I contend that if you recognise the motive you should also recognise the provocation.” 
Suffragette, Frances Parker (1875-1924)
To mark the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 1918 Representation of the People Act twenty renowned and emerging artists were invited to each create an image which was embroidered onto a handkerchief, by London College of Fashion’s specialist embroidery technicians, to mark women’s suffrage.

Embroidered handkerchief with gold and mauve embroidered words in a repeating pattern "Women inspiring women". Photo: Peter Abrahams

Mona Hatoum embroidered handkerchief. Photo: Peter Abrahams

Read More

State of Fashion

Freelance fashion researcher Renee van der Hoek, MA Fashion Curation Alumni, talks about her experience working on the fashion exhibition the State of Fashion 2018.

This year marks my 5th year as a freelance fashion researcher and early career curator since graduating with distinction from MA Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion in 2013, a course that provided me with skills and laid the foundation for my current practice.

Dressed female mannequins on raised platform in an industrial space. State of Fashion 2018.

The New Imaginations theme showed work of game changers such as Iris van Herpen and VIN+OMI. Image: Eva Broekema

Since then I’ve had the opportunity to write for independent fashion magazines such as Press & Fold and Monument, whilst also working as fashion researcher on several  exhibitions here in the Netherlands. The last major exhibition I worked on and still continue to work for the platform itself is State of Fashion. This time last year I got the opportunity to work as the assistant curator at State of Fashion alongside curator José Teunissen (besides her work as an independent fashion curator she’s the Dean of the School of Design and Technology at London College of Fashion (UAL) and Professor of Fashion Theory).

Three dressed mannequin torsos on white plinths with large white cubes as background

The Interdisciplinary approaches theme showed new and innovative materials such as pineapple leather and AlgaeFabrics. Image: Eva Broekema

State of Fashion

To briefly introduce State of Fashion, it’s the successor of the critically acclaimed Arnhem Mode Biennale (2005-2013) and was created to perpetuate its international reputation. State of Fashion is a platform that literally investigates the ‘state of fashion’ and addresses current topics that must be on the agenda of designers and companies, as well as NGOs, researchers, educational institutions and governments.  State of Fashion serves as a ‘safe space for dangerous ideas’. We want to inspire, unleash discussions and provide a stage for the disrupters and changemakers within the industry and beyond. Together we focus on the power of collaboration to create a more resilient, sustainable and inclusive industry.

Large industrial space housing numerous dressed mannequins on plinths and white cubes. State of Fashion 2018.

Image: Eva Broekema

The first edition of State of Fashion, dubbed searching for the new luxury, took place from June 1st until July 22nd. For the exhibition narrative José Teunissen started a quest for a sustainable future for the fashion industry.  When I joined the team José had formed the framework of the exhibition, dividing it into 5 themes: New Imaginations, The Product and the Maker in the Spotlight, New business Models, Fashion Design for a Better World and Interdisciplinary Approaches. At that time the actual objects to illustrate the narrative had yet to be chosen. I had the opportunity to closely work together with José on the realisation of the exhibition. This process was a significant learning experience for me as I felt José and the team trusted me and gave me every opportunity to contribute and leave my mark. All the hard work resulted in an exhibition in which we displayed the work of around 50 designers, brands, projects, and initiatives. All focused on possible solutions to change the industry for the better, from innovative materials, transparent business models to designers shaking up the system. Working on this exhibition also changed my own patterns as a consumer as I can honestly say I’m brainwashed by all the facts I’ve learned when researching for and writing the exhibition texts and catalogue

Two women seated on stage talking to an audience. State of Fashion 2018.

Bethany Williams and me on stage during our 9th whataboutery, discussing the power of collaboration and social responsibility. Image: Getty Images

Whataboutery

Since the exhibition in Arnhem closed we have had the opportunity to go on ‘tour’ to continue the search for the new luxury by organising events and talks, our so-called ‘Whataboutery’.  This series of talks aims to open up the conversation on the challenges that are part of producing sustainable and honest fashion as every potential solution raises new questions: ‘but what about…?’.

So what’s next? At State of Fashion we continue to spread our message and including audiences by organising or participating in talks, events and other exciting opportunities. Please visit Stateoffashion.org to see what we’re doing next or read our digital catalogue of the exhibition in Arnhem here.

Find out more about MA Fashion Curation

Read more posts from MA Fashion Curation students and alumni

 

Fashioning Inclusion event

Fashioning Inclusion (12 December 2018) brings together a diverse group of researchers and practitioners who show that bodies of all abilities and types can be a site for creative self expression.

Head and shoulder portrait of artist Frida Kahlo, wearing blue embroidered blouse, with text Fashioning Inclusion.

Photo credit: Frida Kahlo in blue satin blouse, 1939, photograph by Nickolas Muray. © Nickolas Muray Photo Archives

The challenges of creating with and for different abilities offer new opportunities for experimentation with materials, technologies and aesthetics which can pioneer true innovation for art, performance, fashion and worn objects. From the iconic personal style of artist Frida Kahlo, as discussed by Curators Claire Wilcox and Circe Henestrosa, to performances with disabled and non- disabled dancers by Candoco Dance Company and inclusive design and material development by LCF students and Alumni, Fashioning Inclusion invites you to challenge pre-conceptions about who can engage with fashion, performance and bodily expression and to explore how these spaces can be further opened to be accessible to all.

The venue has limited step-free access. If you need step-free access to evacuate in an emergency, or have other any access requirements, please let us know. More detailed access information is available on our AccessAble page

The event will include BSL translation and will be live streamed and recorded for access off site.

For details of how to book and how to connect to the live stream please check the e-store link on December 12th

For other CfFC events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Objects of a Passion

On Tuesday 13 November 2018, Professor Amy de la Haye gave a Professorial Platform Lecture entitled Objects of a Passion: Curating, Writing and Teaching as Practice 2014-18.  The lecture was organised by themes which had inspired her over the course of her practice.  As a Curator, Writer and Co-Director, alongside Judith Clark, of Centre for Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion, Amy also teaches on the MA Fashion Curation.

A recording of the lecture is available on Youtube.

Read the accompanying interactive leaflet Objects of a Passion

Read more about Professor Amy de la Haye’s research here

Read more about the MA Fashion Curation course

Dressing the Self/Other

Dressing the Self/Other is a reflective piece by Matteo Augello that explores dress performance and re-enactment and their use as research tools and crucial elements in the teaching of fashion history. Augello is a PhD student at the Centre for Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion and a former freelance researcher for the V&A opera exhibition in 2017.  Based on a video clip of his performance-lecture on ’The Art of the Prima Donna’, He will start off this interdisciplinary conversation on the topic of dress and performance by discussing some of his work on dress in Italian Opera.

Visit the Crassh page for more information and booking.

Dressing the Self/Other flier advertising the event at the University of Cambridge 5.30pm - 7.30pm 27 November 2018. Text giving summary. Red header and footer.

Dressing the Self/Other, 5.30pm – 7.30pm 27 November 2018

Read more about Matteo Augello’s research How Italian fashion is collected, preserved and analysed: unfolding the relationship between scholarship and production in the establishment of fashion collections in Italy, 1995-2015.

More posts from Matteo Augello

Page 2 of 17

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén