Tag: fashion curation (Page 1 of 8)

The Cloud Project with the Tim Yip Studio at the Southbank Centre

By NJ Stevenson

This summer I was invited to take part in the Cloud project which was the closing event for London’s Southbank Centre’s three year long China Changing festival  and the result of a year long collaboration between the Southbank and the Chinese-based Tim Yip Studio. A film and stage art director, costume designer and visual artist, Yip is particularly well known for his Academy Award winning work on Ang Lee’s Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000) but works prolifically for stage and film productions, dance companies, art exhibitions and fashion collaborations.

The Cloud Project with the Tim Yip Studio at the Southbank Centre

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Homer Faber: Fashion Inside and Out

Judith Clark has curated Homer Faber: Fashion Inside and Out, part of an inaugural event at the Fondazione Giorgio Cini in Venice showcasing European craftsmanship.  The exhibition, which took place in the spectacular space of the disused Gandini swimming pool, took as its theme how traditional techniques inspire contemporary design and exhibition-making.

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Archiving the Feminist Experience – an exhibition by The Feminist Library

by Jessica Taylor

While working with the Feminist Library on their recent exhibition, Archiving the Feminist Experience, it was my role to curate 15 different artists’ responses to its archive that opened in 1975 during the height of feminism’s second-wave. I took inspiration from the Library’s classification system created by Wendy Davis (a volunteer Librarian) in 1978 as a unique way of categorising the work within the collection that still stands today. This system includes over 20 categories ranging from history, the arts and politics and truly represents the individual experiences of women.

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SpiceUp Review

As the field of fashion curation rapidly expands past the walls of the museum and gallery and into corporate headquarters and shopfronts, it has now conquered a new frontier; the Islington Business Design Centre in London. A space more commonly known for trade shows and recruitment events, for three steamy weeks this summer the location played host to the exhibition SpiceUp. Subtitled “An Exhibition About The Spice Girls” (lest there be any confusion about the subject of the show), this exhibit was an exercise in curatorial agony and visitor ecstasy.

The Spice Girls were a group of five British women, who auditioned to become a pop group in 1994, and ended up becoming a cultural zeitgeist. SpiceUp has been curated without any affiliation with the group or their management, and is a testament to their lasting legacy. Spread over two floors in a side wing of the former Royal Agricultural Hall, there is no context provided for the location, other than the assumption that there are surely few venues in London built to accommodate such a massive assemblage of clothing, ephemera and merchandise, that would also avail themselves for hire to a member of the public. And so SpiceUp curator Alan Smith-Allison is – albeit one who is responsible for collecting the bulk of the objects on display, and owner of the largest collection of Spice Girls memorabilia on earth. A former charity worker turned exhibition maker, Smith-Allison has collected anything and everything Spice Girls-related since 2007, and in curating and staging this exhibit himself, also brought in loaned objects from fellow fans.

The result is almost overwhelming. With over 7000 pieces of ephemera on display, the exhibition reveals how deeply the public travelled into the mercantile heart of darkness in the Spice era. For the purposes of this review, however, my focus is on the dress and its display

Spice Girls memorabilia on display at SpiceUp.  Photo Cyana Madsen 2018 web

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Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities

CfFC’s Jeff Horsley worked on Conscious Contemporary Craft: Connecting Communities Fondazione Zegna / San Patrignano and Making for Change, a Site-specific installation for State of Fashion 2018.

The project is a collaborative initiative that involves the community members of San Patrignano, supported by Fondazione Zegna, and participants in London College of Fashion’s (LCF) Making for Change project.

San Patrignano, located in Northern Italy, is a community promoting the rehabilitation of young people affected by substance misuse. Supported by Fondazione Zegna, San Patrignano enables young individuals to transform themselves through education and the acquisition of craftsmanship skills.

Making for Change is London College of Fashion’s training and manufacturing unit based at HMP Downview women’s prison. The project aims to increase well-being and reduce reoffending rates amongst participants by equipping them with professional fashion-related skills and qualifications within a supportive environment.

Setting up for exhibition

Layers, Holly Sibley 1st Year BA Menswear

If it was, Yubin Meng 1st Year BA Menswear

This project promotes the effectiveness of two social facilities, namely a therapeutic community and a prison to support rehabilitation and introduces young designers to fashion as a means for personal development and social change. Working with menswear designer and LCF graduate Bethany Williams, women in the weaving workshop of San Patrignano created innovative textile samples from industrial waste materials, textile fibres, plastic tapes and electrical wires by using traditional handlooms. These textile samples inspired LCF students to design garments and accessories reflecting contemporary issues, including ‘protect’, ‘migrate’, ‘protest’ and ‘survive’. Six garments incorporating fabrics woven at San Patrignano have been produced at LCF’s workshops. The accessories designed by the students will be interpreted by the women at HMP Downview out of the fabrics woven in San Patrignano.

Earlier in the project, decorative neckpieces were made by the women at HMP Downview as gifts for the women in San Patrignano who, in turn, made purses from hand-woven fabrics for the women at HMP Downview. The women wrote accompanying messages with each gift as a way to communicate and connect with each other.

Footnotes – Sutton House, 9 May 2018

The installation of Footnotes, an exhibition of artist responses to the LCF’s historic shoe archive, took place last week for the exhibition at the National Trust’s Sutton House in Hackney. Shoes from LCF’s diverse collection which includes 1930s orthopaedic footwear, silk slippers from the 1800s and even a shoe made for a sheep, are for the first time on display with Artists Eelko Moorer, Ellen Sampson, Linda Brothwell and Laila Diallo all producing new works inspired by the shoes’ remarkable histories.  New interpretations are revealed in five categories: Scale, Balance, Fragility, Singled Out and Common/Uncommon that employ film, dance and virtual reality in their telling.  The exhibition, which was funded by the Arts Council and supported by Kurt Geiger, is accompanied by a programme of talks and performances running 9 May – summer 2018.

CfFC’s Alison Moloney, curator of the exhibition and research fellow at LCF said:

London College of Fashion’s shoe archive has been compiled to inspire and instruct students in the making and designing of shoes. As objects, the shoes have so many interpretive possibilities for artists because the provenance of each one is unknown. Sutton House provides the perfect backdrop to Footnotes because of its own extensive history. Through this exhibition and accompanying programme of workshops and talks, we want to immerse people in the history of the everyday and in shoes as ways to reanimate the past and access personal and shared cultural memories among the audience.

 

Footnotes  9 May – Summer 2018.

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