Flower Power and the Diesel Takeover by MA Fashion Curation student Maxime Laprade

This summer saw students at London College of Fashion working collaboratively with Diesel to takeover their flagship Covent Garden store with a unique concept spread across three floors.  The takeover, which ran from Thursday 11 August until 12 September celebrates Covent Garden’s floral tradition.

LCF Diesel takeover Maxime Laprade

Photo 11: Diesel Floral Logo. Credit: Maxime Laprade

The winning group comprising Eshaan Dhingra, Griselda Ibarra, Irene Rodriguez, Laksamee Jong, and Maxime Laprade were selected by the company following their work with several groups.  The students are from courses spanning fashion curation to fashion entrepreneurship and innovation, fashion media production and strategic fashion marketing. Here, Maxime Laprade from the MA Fashion Curation course reflects on the experience:

“Back in December, one of the students who has been in my team since then approached me to be part of the Diesel project. Coming from an business MA, she was looking for students with a more creative approach. I said yes.  At the beginning, the approach used –  very marketing and industry focused, even the vocabulary – was not something I was used to. It was a little bit overwhelming at first. As a fashion curation student, I did not know what to bring to the project. However, after a while, I realized that I shouldn’t try to use their methods and approaches, but I should work my way and apply my own particular practice to the project. As a result, I studied the displays, the store, the history of the neighbourhood and connected it to images and visuals.

While doing our research, we discovered the story of the flower girls. That is when I began to be passionate about the project. I continued to look into the history, worked on the window displays and tried to think the store as an exhibition but which would have to be about the customer. The difficulty and novelty for me was that the objective was to increase sales. Therefore, everything needed to be directed to the customer and the merchandising. It was not an exhibition! I needed to think about the product more than anything else and about how to sell it.

LCF Diesel takeover Maxime Laprade


The Gentlemen’s Club in the basement of the store. Credit: Maxime Laprade

 

LCF Diesel takeover Maxime Laprade

Ground Floor just before the launch night. Credit: Maxime Laprade

 

The project is done, and from a fashion curation point of view, it has been an incredible experience. I have collaborated with a brand whose goals are very different from the ones of a museum or an archive. It has helped me thinking of ways to apply curatorial skills to new contexts.

We need to be versatile in our jobs. I stepped out of my comfort zone, learnt new skills, a new vocabulary and I am now more aware of the industry approaches and methods. Moreover, I have learn more about how to present and sell an idea.”

Maxime Laprade, MA Fashion Curation Student, August 2016

Read more: About the student Fashion Takeover on the LCF blog

Diesel, London College of Fashion Say It With Flowers in Covent Garden

Find out about MA Fashion Curation courses at LCF

Fashion Archives in Chicago

Anna Buruma, curator for the Museum & Study Collection at Central St. Martins (CSM) and Archivist at Liberty, received a Refresh grant from the university to visit the 3 different fashion collections in Chicago to learn about how staff dealt with their collections. The Fashion Resource Center (FRC), part of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), and the Fashion Study Collection, (FSC) at Colombia College are both teaching collections, while the visit to the Chicago History Museum  was inspired by their collection of Liberty garments, and Anna’s special interest in that subject.

Here, Anna reflects on the 3 collections, and the differences between the teaching collections and those in a ‘proper’ museum.

Store at Fashion Resource Center. Courtesy of the Fashion Resource Center at the School of Art Institute of Chicago

Store at Fashion Resource Center. Courtesy of the Fashion Resource Center at the School of Art Institute of Chicago

Read More

Balenciaga in Mexico City – by its curator Javier González de Durana

As the first exhibition of Cristóbal Balenciaga in Latin America opened earlier this year at the Museum of Modern Art in Mexico City  María Fernanda Sela talked to Javier González de Durana, curator of the exhibition and former director at the Balenciaga Museum in Spain, to find out how the exhibition was made possible.

María Fernanda Sela: How was the process of selecting the objects for this very first exhibition about Balenciaga in Latin America?

Javier González de Durana: Balenciaga’s production was huge; he presented two collections with 100 and 150 looks each every year. Considering he worked for over 32 years in Paris, there are around 7,000 to 9,000 items in total. The selection for the exhibition presents objects from different styles and eras. What is not explained with dresses, is expressed with a series of photographs from Manuel Outumuro. However, no matter how it’s exhibited, there will always be a lot of Balenciaga to discover.

White Wedding Gown, never exhibited before, belonging to one of Balenciaga’s assistants. "Whenever someone turned 25 or was about to get married" says Javier González de Durana "he let them pick a design to make a new dress and gave it as a present. " Image courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, Mexico City.

White Wedding Gown, never exhibited before, belonging to one of Balenciaga’s assistants. “Whenever someone turned 25 or was about to get married” says Javier González de Durana “he let them pick a design to make a new dress and gave it as a present. ” Image courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, Mexico City.

Read More

Mode in Flux – Roca London Gallery 1 July – 27 August 2016

Coats that turn into tents; garments that change colour and texture in response to temperature fluctuations; interactive clothes that reveal the wearer’s mood — ‘Mode In Flux’ explores notions of adaptability in fashion design.  CfFC catches up with White Line Projects and MA Fashion Curation Alumni Fiona McKay and Xenia Capacete Caballero to talk about their latest exhibition.

flyer

Read More

Reigning Men at LACMA: Marley Healy reviews

In his celebrated tome Walden, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “the mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation,” ultimately failing to live up to their predestined potential and recognition in the universe. However, in the current socio-political climate of the world, it might be possible that the only arena in which men are overwhelmingly underrepresented is fashion.  By Marley Healy.

(left) Waistcoat, England or France 1740s. (right) Waistcoat, France c.1730. Photo courtesy of Marley Healy

(left) Waistcoat, England or France 1740s. (right) Waistcoat, France c.1730. Photo courtesy of Marley Healy

Read More

White Boots

Barbie, that much maligned American ‘doll’ with the movie star looks, has at last had a square meal. By Claire Wilcox.

Sindy Ice Skating gear

Sindy Ice Skating outfit, Ca. 1964 Photo Claire Wilcox

 

She has swelled out, her fragile limbs are more robust, and her rounded hips suggest the possibility of fecundity. Barbie’s less precocious British cousin, the Sindy of my childhood, was 30cm tall and also improbably thin; her inflexible joints made getting dressed something of a wrangle. If recreated in human proportions she would be a freak of nature. Yet this didn’t seem to matter, for she had superhuman qualities: ‘more than a doll, she is a real personality’ the advertising displays claimed. Her facial features – tiny nose and huge, sideways glancing eyes – were rendered with some delicacy, while Medusa-like hair sprouted from her oversized head. I brushed it firmly, using the white plastic hairbrush provided. But although the instructions said ‘her hair can be washed and set time after time’, the gleaming nylon strands always reverted to their original configuration.

Read More

Encountering the Archive: Object handling workshop

The Im/Material: Encounters within the Creative Arts Archive Conference  took place at UAL on May 13 and 14 2016.  The handling sessions were an opportunity for material objects to speak.  Jane Holt ran the Fashion Archives sessions and brought along six artefacts from LCF Archives which the participants were encouraged to handle. Here she talks about their responses.

Mary Quant make up crayons, early 1960s. Photo Courtesy of Jane Holt, LCF Archives

Mary Quant make up crayons, early 1960s. Photo Courtesy of Jane Holt, LCF Archives

Read More

Renewal – Curation students unpack the Allure of the Archive

Lasting only one and half days, but by no means less meaningful and impacting, Renewal was a student-led collaborative exhibition that unpacks the obsessive allure of the institutional archive deep from within UAL collections.  MA Fashion Curation student Luke Moss was there. 

Read More

Fashion curation in China: Amy de la Haye talks to student Casey Guo on life following the course

Casey Guo studied on the MA Fashion Curation course from 2009-11. From the outset, her explicit objective was to return to China equipped with a range of skills to develop fashion curatorship and exhibition-making as disciplines in her home country. Her final project was a fascinating and imaginative hypothetical exhibition on Chinese theatre costumes. Last week Casey contacted Amy de la Haye with news of her career progression.

“Visiting museums is not a habit for ordinary Chinese people yet, including art students.” Casey says. She told me that Chinese museums continue to house permanent displays of historical and traditional Chinese textiles and dress, but still do not engage with contemporary international fashion.

 

Ines Figaredo handbags on used barrels, Alter concept store. Image courtesy of Casey Guo

Ines Figaredo handbags on used barrels, Alter concept store. Image courtesy of Casey Guo

 

Read More

Utopian Bodies – MA Fashion Curation Alumni wins exhibition of the year

Utopian Bodies – Fashion Looks Forward at Liljevalchs Museum in Stockholm has won Exhibition of the Year 2015.  Co-Curated by Sofia Hedman who studied MA Fashion Curation at London College of Fashion, and Serge Martynov, the exhibition was one of 27 exhibitions in Sweden which went before the judges.

Utopian Bodies Best Exhibition 2015

 

Read More

Page 1 of 3

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén